Defining Sanity and Humanity

31iQzpiE6HL._BO1,204,203,200_

I’ve been away from my blog for some time. Knowing it exists, and that I would return, was always a comforting thought. I am pages from completing a fascinating, enlightening, true story and could wait, no longer, to share it.
I am grappling with the term “forever changed” by this book. Instead, I think it is more accurate, in my own case, to say “finally aware” or “forever defined”.
This is a firsthand story of a brain scientist’s stroke. There is a wealth of science about symptoms and perceptions, from the victim’s view. It is an essential part of the story and, really, not hard to learn and appreciate but the overall message and “insight” into the human psyche will “blow you away”!
We are a single being which operates, through our world, by using two separate, yet connected, brain hemispheres. The story exposes the purpose and function of those hemispheres in enlightening detail. The author’s conclusions about the necessity for both to function in unison in order to offer a life “rich” in a common conscientiousness are extraordinary, possibly, life changing.
As I read this book, I was thankful for my years with children for my primarily hopeful perspective about living “in the moment”. Jill Bolte Taylor hits the “nail on the head”, in my opinion, about how much of our own happiness is a matter of how we CHOSE to perceive the world. Embracing how ordinary events make us “feel” (emotionally and physiologically) just may be the biggest tool in the counteracting of everyday depression and sadness.
The author does not disregard the fact that our mental health is subject to chemical reactions beyond our control. The awareness that we CAN control much of it, though, (beyond brain damage and illness) offers a primer in a more fulfilling, happy, existence.
Incidentally, the carefree, forgiving, nature of man’s best friend seems to further explain why our Left Brains (containing speech and ego) can be our worst enemy if left to control too much of our time. On the other hand, who wants children, or dogs, making critical decisions?
As with everything we learn about life, balance is the best medicine.
I’ve barely scratched the surface of the wisdom between the covers of this book!

  • How to recognize a stroke.
  • How to treat stroke victims.
  • The recuperative power of sleep.
  • How our brains interpret the world.
  • The importance of patience and kindness.

I give this book 11 stars out of 10.

My Unpopular Opinion

Proposition 19 in California.

The legalization of marijuana for recreational use.

I am not a marijuana user.

I DO know many people who do use it.

It is not good for your body. Neither is, tobacco, fatty foods,alcohol, smog,sugars, caffeine, too much exercise,too little exercise etc.

It is currently an illegal substance.

It is used by millions of people for many reasons.

Does Prohibition ring a bell? How did that work out?

Why hasn’t the federal government outlawed cigarettes? ( They seem to enjoy the revenue and lawsuits.)

Now my argument:

Since the discovery of the existence of ADD and like disorders, we are finding that quite a number of folks have issues. (There are some who still believe those ailments do not exist.) I for one, DO believe that they exist. There are many people who are exceptionally shy and have social issues too.

The ability of physicians to diagnose and treat these conditions is sketchy at best. It can take years to find,and treat with the correct personal “cocktail” of drugs. Many people do not ever find relief because it takes a personal committment  to multiple office visits and so on… These sufferers lack the “medical stamina” to find their own cure. Once they become adults, no one can take over for them.

In my own personal experience, I have witnessed marijuana providing relief to these people. Although, it is not the best for the body, it sure beats isolation, unemployment due to social problems, self-medicating with alcohol (which has much worse consequences, in my opinion.), anger related crimes and suicide.

NEVER would I have dreamed that I would agree with anything Californians came up with! I really don’t see a down side to this proposition. I also do not believe it carries a greater risk of harder drugs. Actually, the only reason people have come to this conclusion is that marijuana has been in the “hands” of the illegal drug dealers who then have an opportunity to offer harder drugs to those clients who really were not seeking them.

  • new businesses and revenue
  • those who self-medicate with alcohol will have a better option (never saw someone who was “high” beat their kids or start a fight.)
  • it would still be held to the same standards as alcohol. Driving impaired or possession by minors NOT TOLERATED.
  • separating it from the drugs we all know are most harmful will keep the DEA on the trail of the REAL criminals. (Even Massachusetts believes that marijuana wastes their precious anti-drug efforts. They decriminalized it.)

Just wanted to add my two cents. I welcome your opinion.